SELECTED APPLICATIONS OF NANOTECHNOLOGY IN TEXTILES

Khaled Issa, Rudi Grütz
Y. W. H. Wong*, C. W. M. Yuen*, M. Y. S. Leung*, S. K. A. Ku*, and H. L. I. Lam**
*Institute of Textiles and Clothing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
**Specialized Technology Resources (H.K.) Ltd.

The use of nanotechnology in the textile industry has increased rapidly due to its unique and valuable properties. The present status of nanotechnology use in textiles is reviewed, with an emphasis on improving various properties of textiles.

Date Added: 2006-03-31
Date Added: 2006-03-31

STUDY OF TEXTILE POTENTIAL OF FIBRES EXTRACTED FROM TUNISIAN AGAVE AMERICANA L.

Slah Msahli* **, Faouzi Sakli** and Jean-Yves Drean*
*Laboratory of Textile Physics and Mechanics
ENSITM, 11 rue Alfred Werner, 68093 Mulhouse Cedex, France
**Textile Research Unit of ISET Ksar Hellal,
B.P 68 Ksar Hellal 5070, Tunisia

Agave Americana L. fibres have quite important textile potential. In this paper, we demonstrate this potential by studying the extraction of these fibres from leaves, their physical properties such as fineness, density and their mechanical behaviour in tensile tests. The intrinsic variability of all these properties is also studied, showing natural maturity and ageing of fibres.

Date Added: 2006-03-31
Date Added: 2006-03-31

DYNAMIC CLOTH FELL MOVEMENT Part I: Critical review

Hisham A. Azzam
Lecturer of Textile Engineering, Textile Technology Department, Industrial Education College, Beni-Suef, Egypt
Alexander Büsgen
Textile Technology Department, University of Applied Science, Mönchengladbach, Germany

Extensive coverage of previous work in the area of cloth fell movement, the circumstances of its beginning, and its influences are reviewed. The review also includes previous work describing factors that affect cloth fell movement.
The advantages and disadvantages of the methods used hitherto are underlined and the need of a satisfactory measuring method is emphasised.

Date Added: 2006-03-31
Date Added: 2006-03-31

DYNAMIC CLOTH FELL MOVEMENT Part II: New measuring device

Hisham A. Azzam
Lecturer of Textile Engineering, Textile Technology Department, Industrial Education College, Beni-Suef, Egypt
Alexander Büsgen
Textile Technology Department, University of Applied Science, Mönchengladbach, Germany

A new flexible cloth fell movement measuring device, hereafter referred to as the 'needle-mechanical device', has been developed to facilitate the use, for the first time, of a measuring position just 2 millimetres from the cloth fell. In addition, the experimental set-up was built in a combination between the needle-mechanical device and the Weave Master to record the dynamic cloth fell's movement cycles on-loom. The results of these measurements were analysed and discussed in the light of the theory developed in part I.

Date Added: 2006-03-31
Date Added: 2006-03-31

BRAIDED ANGLE MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUE FOR THREE-DIMENSIONAL BRAIDED COMPOSITE MATERIAL PREFORM USING MATHEMATICAL MORPHOLOGY AND IMAGE TEXTURE

Wan Zhenkai, Li Jialu
Tianjin Polytechnic University
(Tianjin 300160, People's Republic of China)

This paper describes a new measuring algorithm for estimating the exterior average braided angle of a three-dimensional (3-D) braided composite material preform] based on image texture. In this project, an advanced filtered algorithm for an image of a 3-D braided composite material preform is developed on the basis of mathematical morphology. Median filter algorithms for mathematical morphology are applied in the system. The polar spectrum and main properties are investigated in the paper.
Theory shows that a rotated texture's polar spectrum is an approximate translation of the unrotated texture's polar spectrum, and that the degree of each translation approximates to the corresponding rotation of the surface.
The system was tested on both carbon and glass fibre preforms. We have obtained very encouraging experimental results, which show that the proposed method is feasible. So far, the research is a new development for measuring 3-D braided composite material preforms.
The work will lay the foundation for establishing a test standard for 3-D braided composite material in China.

Date Added: 2006-03-31
Date Added: 2006-03-31

APPLICATION OF THE IMAGE ANALYSIS TECHNIQUE FOR TEXTILE IDENTIFICATION

Robert Drobina, Mieczysław S. Machnio
Technical University of Bielsko-Biała
Institute of Textile Engineering and Polymer Materials, Poland

Computer image analysis techniques used for identifying textile products, especially linear textile products, are presented in this paper, together with a brief review of the historical development of these methods. Automatic and semi-automatic image correction methods are described, which are often applied for identification of linear textile products, and can also be used to identify spliced yarn-end connections.

Date Added: 2006-03-31
Date Added: 2006-03-31

ACOUSTIC UNDERLAY MANUFACTURED FROM CARPET TILE WASTES Part 2: Comparative study of optimised underlay with commercial products of similar calibre in accordance to universal standards

Mohsen Miraftab*, Ian Rushforth** and Kirill Horoshenkov***
*Centre for Materials Research & Innovation, University of Bolton, U.K.
**Liverpool City Council, U.K.
***School of Engineering, University of Bradford, U.K.

Carpet waste has successfully been converted into acoustic underlay materials that compete with commercial counterparts both in terms of performance and costs. This paper builds on an earlier paper [Miraftab et al, Autex Res.J.5(2), 96-105 (2005).] where granular/fibre mixing ratios, binder concentration and particle size distribution were shown to play a major role in maximising impact sound insulation capabilities of developed underlays. Product optimisation with respect to the particle size as governed by the aperture dimension and mean effective fibre length is further explored in this paper, and the developed underlay is compared with a selection of commercially available acoustic underlays. The results show that a 2mm-aperture screen at the granulating chamber output yields a waste stream with grains in the size range of 0.5-1.0mm and a mean effective fibre length of 2.75 mm which was most suitable to work with, and gave rise to samples with the best impact sound reduction performance. The optimised sample of 10mm recycled underlay (U2) appeared to perform better than most commercial systems tested. The manufactured underlay withstood, and in some instances, outperformed, during the standard tests as required within the BS 5808 protocol. The study concludes that recycling carpet waste to produce quality acoustic underlay with desirable impact sound insulation characteristics is technically feasible, and a viable alternative to landfill or incineration.

Date Added: 2006-03-31
Date Added: 2006-03-31
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