EFFECT OF THREAD STRUCTURE ON TENSION PEAKS DURING LOCK STITCH SEWING

Rengasamy R S1 and Samuel Wesley D2
1Department of textile technology, IIT Delhi, New Delhi-110016, India, rsrengasamy@gmail.com
2Department of fashion technology (Apparel production), NIFT, Chennai-600113, India, dswesley@gmail.com

A dynamic sewing tension study was carried out with a tension probe on sewing threads with different structures, physical and tensile characteristics in a single needle lock stitch sewing machine. The needle thread recorded four major tension peaks corresponding to events occurring during sewing; bobbin thread withdrawal, stitch tightening, needle piercing the fabric and tightening of the needle thread around the shuttle, among which stitch tightening caused the maximum tension for all threads. Polyester filament and spun polyester threads exhibited the highest and lowest tightening tension, respectively. Multiple regression analysis showed that pre-tension and elastic modulus show positive influences while tex, bending, rigidity and compressibility of threads show negative effects on tension peaks during tightening and needle piercing. Sewing speed shows a positive impact only on the tension peak due to needle piercing. Pre-tension showed a prominent influence on tension peaks on all threads while the number of fabric layers failed to show any effect.

Date Added: 2011-04-03
Date Added: 2011-04-03

MASS CUSTOMISATION OF FLAT KNITTED FASHION PRODUCTS: SIMULATION OF THE CO-DESIGN PROCESS

Joel Peterson1, Jonas Larsson1, Malik Mujanovic1, Heikki Mattila2
1University of Boras, Swedish School of Textiles, S-50190, Boras, Sweden
2Tampere University of Technology, Materials Sciences, P.O. Box 589, FI-33101 Tampere, Finland
Contact: Joel.Peterson@hb.se

In 1995, the Japanese manufacturer Shima Seiki introduced the first complete garment knitting machine capable of producing a ready-made flat knitted article under the trade name WholeGarment. Recently, the company also developed a co-design software tool, Ordermade WholeGarment®, for the customisation of knitted fashion garments. Factory Boutique Shima, their retail shop for on-demand production of customised knitted garments, makes it possible for clients to modify a knitted garment according to personal taste in style, colour, pattern and size. This study examines how such a process streamlines the interaction between customer and shop personnel, while expediting the programming of the knitting machine. In comparing the manual co-design process with the
Ordermade WholeGarment® system, we used a computer simulation to analyse the efficiency and lead times of
each concept. The case study method was employed with an inductive approach based on company visits and interviews.
 

Date Added: 2011-04-03
Date Added: 2011-04-03

SALT-FREE DYEING - A NEW METHOD OF DYEING ON LYOCELL/COTTON BLENDED FABRICS WITH REACTIVE DYES

Aravin Prince Periyasamy, Bhaarathi Dhurai, K.Thangamani
II-M.Tech Textile Technology, Department of Textile Technology
Kumaraguru College of Technology, Coimbatore -06, T.N, India
E-mail: aravinprince@gmail.com

Cellulosic/regenerated blended fabrics dyed with reactive dyes require a large amount of salt, which pollutes fresh watercourses. Due to the hydrolysis of the dye, the dyeing effluent consists of a large amount of hydrolysed dye, and it requires a high volume of water to remove the hydrolysed dye in a wash-off process. Lyocell/cotton fabrics were dyed with reactive dyes using conventional methods and pretreating the fabric with polyvinylamine chloride (at five different concentrations). Pretreated samples were dyed without using salt as an electrolyte. The influence of pretreatment on K/S value, wash fastness, rubbing fastness, tensile strength, flexural rigidity and crease recovery were determined. It was found that pretreatment of Lyocell/cotton fabrics with polyvinylamine chloride increases dye uptake and shows good wash fastness and rubbing fastness. There was a slight increase in crease recovery angle and flexural rigidity in the pretreated sample. It was determined that polyvinylamine chloride was found to be effective for pretreatment in salt-free dyeing of Lyocell/cotton fabrics.
 

Date Added: 2011-04-03
Date Added: 2011-04-03

DYEING OF GLASS FIBRES BY THE SOL GEL METHOD

Andrea Chládová1, Jakub Wiener1, Jewel Mavela Luthuli1, Veronika Zajícová2
1Technical University of Liberec, Faculty of Textile Engineering, Department of Textile Chemistry, Liberec,
2Technical University of Liberec, Faculty of Science, Humanities and Pedagogy, Department of Chemistry, Liberec, Czech
Republic, E-mail: andrea.chladova@tul.cz

This study focused on the dyeing of glass fibres by colour layers created by the sol gel method. Glass fibres are used as a typical example of fibres with non-ideal dyeing properties. Glass and similar dyes are rigid, the internal fibre structure is non-porous and the glass transition temperature is very high. The sol gel method is used for the fixation of selected dyes on the fibre surface. In this study, we compared basic, disperse and metal complex
dyes. The properties of coloured textiles were tested by standard and modified fastness tests. The stability to temperature, washing and light was different according the basic properties of the used dyes. The results of the tests are discussed in this paper. The process of dyeing fibres with sol simultaneously results in reasonable dye fastnesses to the fibres; at the same time, bright and dark shades can also be obtained. The sol used is based on the blending of 3-trimethoxysilyl propyl methacrylate in isopropanol with supporting chemicals (water, HCl, benzoyl peroxide).
 

Date Added: 2011-04-03
Date Added: 2011-04-03

TOPOGRAPHICAL EFFECTS OF O2- AND NH3-PLASMA TREATMENT ON WOVEN PLAIN POLYESTER FABRIC IN ADJUSTING HYDROPHILICITY

Alfredo Calvimontes1*, Rajib Saha2, Victoria Dutschk3
1Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research Dresden, Hohe Str. 6, 01069 Dresden, Germany, E-mail address: calvimontes@ipfdd.de
2Institute of Textile Machinery and High Performance Material Technology Dresden at Technical University of Dresden,
Hohe Str. 6, 01069 Dresden, Germany
3EFSM group, Faculty for Engineering Technology, University of Twente, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands

Hydrophilisation of polyester textile materials has been investigated over the last twenty years using low-pressure and atmospheric plasmas. According to these studies, wettability and capillarity of fabrics can be significantly improved depending on the process gas used. In the present study, the effects of low pressure O2- and NH3- plasma on the morphology and topometry of fabrics on four different length scales, as well as the influence of the topographical changes of textile structures on the resulting water spreading and absorption rates were investigated. The results of the topographic characterisation using two non-contact optical methods and wettability
measurements indicate that the modification of filament nano-topography cannot satisfactorily explain the drastic
changes observed in wettability. Dimensional changes (relaxation and shrinkage) as well as changes in warp
morphology and inter-yarn spaces are more decisive for inducing hydrophilicity in polyester woven plain fabrics
than an increase in the surface nano-roughness of their filaments.
 

Date Added: 2011-04-03
Date Added: 2011-04-03
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